ARTIST STATEMENT
EXHIBITION HISTORY
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Artist Statement -




Artists Statement Austen Pinkerton


If I turn my mind to it very quickly I can come up with several ideas for works …paintings, drawings, or sculptures.
Sometimes ideas come to me when I least expect it, or when my mind is on other things. Ideas can be related to my current experiences, or to my feelings about things that are happening to me in my life at that particular time. Alternatively they can be related to a current interest, or something that occupies my attention at that moment, and my ideas and feelings about which Id like to share with others.
A lot of my work is autobiographical…either directly or indirectly, consciously or subconsciously. It is frequently very personal, and expresses events or circumstances or experiences in my life.
I usually work in either Acrylic on Canvas, Crayon or Pastel, or both together, with Gouache, on card, Drawing in pencil, or Ink, or both, or with creating Sculpture…for which I use fired artists clay. Sculpture follows a completely different set of rules and values from two-dimensional art, obviously, I think of it as Drawing in three dimensions and I take this into account when creating mine. In all my works of art, however, or from whatever, they are made, what they crucially entail, to me, are craftsmanship and beauty, but above all content and meaning.
When I have an idea I execute it, and when I begin to execute it, at least after the initial layout phase, the creation process becomes to some extent automatic, especially the further into the work I get. I dont give a great deal of thought to what I am doing , but probably pay more attention to the music Im listening to than to the creative process ......especially since I very frequently will work on a picture upside down in its later stages. This may explain in part why I frequently do not understand how certain things have appeared in my works.
As a result of this it often happens that when I look at a work again that I’ve made, maybe after several years, that I will be surprised at how it has worked out, at why I did certain things, and especially what the work is ‘about’…i.e. it’s underlying meaning. Often I see the meaning of a work more clearly after coming back to it after many years.





Biography Austen Pinkerton


Austen Pinkerton was born in 1951 in North Harrow, north-west London, and educated locally at Pinner County Grammar School, leaving with nine O ordinary level, and four A advanced level passes.
On leaving school he began study at the Oxford School of Architecture, where he spent the first two years, before it being suggested that he should consider transferring to Art College, as a result of pictures he included in an end of term exhibition.
He then went to Goldsmiths College, London University, School of Art, graduating in 1976 with a Batchelor of Arts Fine Art Painting.
At Goldsmiths School of Art the Principal was Jon Thompson, later mentor to the likes of Damian Hurst, and his tutors included the artists Albert Irvin, Basil Beatty, and Andrew Brighton, later to be curator of public events at Tate Modern. The painting school was in the old Surrey Docks Office building, Rotherhithe, from which there was a burglary, and six of his paintings were stolen and none by any other student to his knowlege. None have ever been recovered.
After leaving Goldsmiths he returned to architecture in order to earn a living and subsequently worked for about 30 years part-time in a variety of Architectural- related fields, whilst continuing to Paint, Draw, and make Sculptures. For a while he was illustrating and designing the interiors of English traditional pubs in this country, and also, later, abroad,... notably Italy, France and Spain. He has also worked on interior refurbishments of the Law Society, and the Royal College Of Surgeons.
Meanwhile he exhibited his work at many galleries in London,…in particular The Blackheath Gallery, Krane arts, the contemporary arts wing of Krane Kalman, also The Talent Store, Graffitti Gallery, Gagliardi Gallery, and, repeatedly, at The Horniman Museum, South London, and the Gloucester Gallery, Kensington, run by Joan Catlin, former Registrar of The Royal College Of Art, and to one of which exhibitions Sir Eduardo Paolozzi visited by invitation to see his work.
Between 1990 and 1996 he opened and ran a gallery in East Dulwich, south London, ..The Austen Pinkerton Gallery , showing his own work. At this time he was commissioned to produce a series of illustrations for the Times Higher Educational Supplement.
He has had numerous private commissions, most notably three very large installed paintings at No 36 Wharton Street, Islington, which began initially with a picture for Major Hamish Forbes, Director of the Museum of the Order of St. John, St. Johns Gate, and former resident of Colditz. When this picture was moved to a new house another was commissioned by the new owner. and the same again when that moved with its owner.
Up until August 2007 he worked part time for the architect Richard Lincoln and also with the Interior Designer Chester Jones on High End Residential properties in central London. Included amongst these was Sir Ridley Scotts house in Hampstead.
Meanwhile he continued to paint, draw, and make sculptures.
From August 2007 to October 2008 he worked part-time for Chistopher Smallwood Architects, Fulham, London, as a Senior Architectural Technician.
As a result of the collapse in the construction industry in 2008 he set up his own business in partnership with the photographer Stephen Street as a general builder, whilst continuing to work as an artist on average two days a week.
Due to a presence on the American website ‘Absolutearts’, and the British website ‘Londonart’, he has to date been offered three exhibitions in the United States, three in the U.K., and exhibitions in Poland and Hong Kong. All the above were offers to participate in large group shows. One exhibition in the USA in North Carolina has so far taken place. He has also contributed to a group exhibition at the Arkhangel gallery in Listowel, Eire.
In 2011 he was offered a two year contract with the Corporate Art branch of the GX fine art Gallery in Camberwell, South London, Since closed.
From late 2011 he began to enter for public competitions, e.g. John Moores, BP Portrait award, Whitechapel Open, R. I. of British Watercolour Artists, Pastel Society, R. I. of British Artists, Cork Street Open, Threadneedle competition, Painter Stainers competition, National Art Open….. and has been shortlisted seven times to date.
In October 2012 his picture ‘The Bay’ was chosen for the Threadneedle Prize competition at the Mall Galleries, Central London.
In February 2013 his large drawing ‘Pentre Ifan’ was chosen for the Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize competition, The Mall Galleries, Central London.
In 2011 his biography was included in the Goldmark Gallery two volume publication of artist biographiesBritish Artists Since 1945 by David Buckman. Curiously his to his knowledge entirely unknown large painting Hangliders was listed by Buckman as a Major Work.
In 2013 he moved with his wife Hilary to Narberth, Pembrokeshire, South-West Wales.
In 2014 he was asked to exhibit two sculptures at the Ceri Richards Gallery, Taliesin Center, Swansea University.
In November 2015 he was asked to enter work for the Winter Show at the Ceri Richards Gallery.
From March 2016 he has been participating in shows at the Waterfront Gallery, Milford Haven.
In May 2017 a detailed 1300 word critcal review author unknown of three of his works along with introduction, conclusion, and references was published on the Studentshare website, used by university students, as an example presumably of a Masters Degree essay in Contemporary Art criticism.
This has since appeared on an equivalent student essay website in the USA.
In June 2017 he was asked to participate in the Art On The Faith Trail group exhibition at primarily St Davids Cathedral, and also at Mathry Church, Pembrokeshire.














Artist Exhibitions




1973 OXFORD PLAYHOUSE GALLERY Nov 3rd-22nd One Man Show

1976 BLACKHEATH GALLERY
Tranquil Vale, Blackheath Mixed show

1977 BLACKHEATH GALLERY
Tranquil Vale, Blackheath Feb 4th-March 12th Mixed Show
1977 BLACKHEATH GALLERY July 28th-Sept 4th Mixed Show
Tranquil Vale, Blackheath

1977 GRAFFITTI GALLERY
-78 Gt. Marlborough Street, W 1 Oct 31st-May 1st Mixed Show

1979 ARTEFACT
-80 Colwell Rd., East Dulwich, SE22 April 1st-Jan. 1st Mixed show

1980 CRANE ARTS
321 Kings Road, Chelsea March 10th-August 1st Mixed show

1980 CASA PUPO GALLERY
Pimlico April 7th-May 27th Mixed show

1980 CASA PUPO GALLERY
Pimlico May 13th-June 3rd Mixed show

1982 BRITISH ARTISTS SHOW
Chelsea Town Hall,
Kings Rd., Chelsea July 9th-11th Mixed Show

1982 THE TALENT STORE GALLERY
Eccleston street, Victoria Sept 29th-October 29th One Man Show

1986 OPEN STUDIO SHOW
South London gallery, Camberwell Sept 11th-October 1st Group Show

1987 CREATIVE IMAGE GALLERY
Bulstrode Street, W1 Aug. 19th-Oct. 31st Mixed Show

1987 SOUTH LONDON OPEN
South London Gallery, Camberwell Oct 22nd-Nov. 12th Mixed show

1987 TEN ARTISTS FROM
NORFOLK HOUSE
Goldsmiths art education Gallery
Lewisham way, New Cross 31st Oct-14th Nov. Group Show


1988 OPEN STUDIO SHOW
Norfolk House studios, Deptford May 13th-15th One Man show

1988 AIR GALLERY
Rosebury Avenue, EC1 June 8th-12th Mixed Show

1989 SOUTHWARK INSTITUTE SHOW
Southwark College Gallery,
Elephant Castle May 2nd- 13th Mixed show

1989 CRITICS SPACE 1V
Air Gallery, Rosebury Avenue, EC1 9th-27th May Mixed Show


1989 SUMMER ART SALE
Air Gallery,
Rosebury avenue, EC1 16th-19th June Mixed show

1989 OPEN STUDIO SHOW
Norfolk House, Deptford 13th-15th October Mixed show

1990 AUSTEN PINKERTON GALLERY
North Cross road, East Dulwich Opened to public Own Work

1992 OPEN STUDIO SHOW
Carrington House, Deptford 19th-21st June Mixed show

1992 HORNIMAN MUSEUM
London road, Forest Hill 29th May-13th August One man
Sculpture show

1992 INTERIOR SPACE
22 Thackeray Street, Kensington Small mixed
show

1993 HORNIMAN MUSEUM
London Road, Forest Hill 3rd Nov.-6th August One Man
Drawings show

1994 HORNIMAN MUSEUM
London Road, Forest Hill 1st August-31st August One Man
Sculpture show




1994 GLOUCESTER GALLERY
12 Gloucester road, Kensington 3rd-28th November Mixed show

1995 GLOUCESTER GALLERY
12 Gloucester road, Kensington 5th-31st January Mixed show

1995 SEKIGUCHI OPTICAL CO.
2 Hanover street, W1 8th April-20th May One Man show

1995 GLOUCESTER GALLERY
12 Gloucester road, Kensington 31st July-26th August Dual show

1995 HORNIMAN MUSEUM
London road, Forest Hill 21st November-3rd January 96
One man
Sculpture show

1996 GLOUCESTER GALLERY
12 Gloucester road, Kensington 3rd Jan-26th April Mixed Show

1996 GLOUCESTER GALLERY
12 Gloucester road, Kensington 1st June-28th June One Man Show

1996 GLOUCESTER GALLERY
12 Gloucester road, Kensington 22nd oct-22nd November Sculptures only

1997 LARA-RAE GALLERY
Buckhurst Hill Prints only

2002 LENNOX GALLERY
Moore Park Road, Fulham
London 20th May � 1st June Major One
Man Show

2007 ARKHANGEL GALLERY
Listowel, Kerry, Ireland 11th March- 22nd April Group Show
Spring Exhibition

2007 ARKHANGEL GALLERY
Listowel, Kerry, Ireland 19th April � 22nd April Stall at Chelsea Art Fair, Chelsea town Hall, London

2008 GAGLIARDI GALLERY
509 Kings Road, London SW10 3rd June � 17th June Gallery Show



2010 ANDREWS ART MUSEUM 1ST May � 31st May Show of International Artists

2012 THREADNEEDLE PRIZE 25th September � 13th October
Mall Galleries, The Mall, London Exhibiting Artist

2013 LYNN PAINTER STAINERS PRIZE 19th February � 2nd March
Mall Galleries, The Mall, London Exhibiting Artist

2014 ARKHANGEL GALLERY
Scottish Malt Whiskey Society,
Members Room, Greville Street, London February to April Group Show

2015 CERI RICHARDS GALLERY
Taliesin Centre, Swansea University Campus Summer Show Two sculptures

2015 CERI RICHARDS GALLERY
Taliesin Centre, Swansea University Campus Winter Show Five small paintings

2016 WATERFRONT GALLERY
Dockside, Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire Continuous Show Various works

2017 ART ON THE FAITH TRAIL
At. St Davids Cathedral, St Davids City, Pembrokeshire
And also Mathry Church, Mathry, Pembrokeshire
16th June to 31st July Group Show
2018 ART ON THE FAITH TRAIL
At. St Davids Cathedral, St Davids City, Pembrokeshire
And also Mathry Church, Mathry, Pembrokeshire
11th June to 31st July Group Show ...

Artist Publications



 
I found this critical assessment of three of my works quite by accident around May 2017 via a random Google Search: 'Austen Pinkerton Artist' It was done by someone...no idea who, for a website used by students...in this case for a masters degree...presumably in Contemporary Fine Art Criticism...as a guide to how to write a review for their finals . There you go...A.P.

Please note All three artworks reviewed can be found reproduced in my Artwork pages.

'Describe the work of a contemporary artist, designer or filmmaker you think is of particular interest and importance.'
Masters Degree Essay



CONTEMPORARY ARTIST: AUSTEN PINKERTON

INTRODUCTION: Contemporary art generally referred to today’s art. It included art made from the late 1960s to the present. Contemporary art was also referred to as ‘postmodern art’ because it followed after the end of modern art or the modernist period. It should be noted, however, that artists were in the present day, making modern art as well as art in practically all past styles or modes . The most important aspect of contemporary art was its indefinability. It could not be categorized easily into a particular medium or a specific school. With globalization, the distinctions within Art had loosened. Contemporary art practices, the vibrancy and dissonance in today’s art scene, are unique. Kocur p1987 . Another notable characteristic of contemporary art was that the theme was normally an issue that affected the present-day world: cloning, politics, economics, issues of gender, race, class, human rights, ethnicity, etc1. Contemporary art was also not limited by the materials used or the methodology. The art was vividly emotional, hence the accusation of ‘sensationalism’. By going for the jugular, these artists made main-stream British culture pay attention. Emphasis on the tangible, rather than a vague conceptualism, distinguished British art of the past fifteen years. Guardian .
Austen Pinkerton was the British contemporary artist I selected, for discussing three of his works. He had specialized in acrylic and water colours. Austen said that he took inspiration from the world around him. He used representational elements as the starting point for his compositions. With the help of his memory and imagination, he created a whole new environment, full of narrative and emotion: “Sometimes I just want to express my feelings, about something or the other in my life or in the world around me.”1 The main reason for my selecting Austen Pinkerton was that his works were full of aesthetic appeal. I have selected three of his works which can be identified with historical art, having the qualities of aesthetics like beauty, purity and transcendence2. The online gallery of his paintings, can be accessed for the complete range of his works from pre-1970s to his
new work: post-20053. His earlier work had several examples of modernistic, simplistic and abstract art, and several portraits and still-life.
The three art works selected from Austen Pinkerton’s works are shown below:
Absolutearts Online Art Gallery .

Painting Acrylic, 2003 Title: ‘SUNSET CITY’

Width: 350 mm. Depth: 25 mm.
Height: 450 mm. Frame: Wood.
Theme: Architectural Cityscape.
DESCRIPTION: In this beautiful and carefully executed painting, the splendour and colour of a magnificent city sunset is presented in all its glory. Austen’s art- approach and compelling style is suitable for land, water and city scapes. Strong contrasts provide drama and excitement in the sky’s colours.
The cool evening environment at sunset- time is clearly portrayed. The blazing colours of the sunset are seen reflected from the windows and front façade of the building in the fore-ground. The fiery colours of the sunset off-set the cool atmosphere of the evening. The detailed work, showing the other high-rise buildings in the area, with their structural features clearly etched, is awe-inspiring. This dynamic and challenging work is breath-taking in its beauty. The painstaking piece of art has been executed with an eye to great detail and reproduction of the scene as naturally as possible. The view is from the street, from where it is seen that high above the city sky-line, the banded clouds glow with the blazing hues of sunset. The play of light and shadow has been done very realistically. Some of the buildings in the background are partially in the shade.
Since the essence of the spectacular cityscape has been caught faithfully on the canvas, we feel the same awe at the splendour, as the artist who had witnessed it.

Title: ‘THE RIVER’ ACRYLIC PAINTING 2005
Width: 1960 mm. Frame: Wood Depth: 30 mm.

Height: 735 mm. Theme: Landscape River

DESCRIPTION: A panoramic view of a river as it emerges in rapids between bluffs, over a waterfall with rainbow, and then flows onward towards the sea. Everywhere there are details of interest: people, buildings, ancient monuments, castles, shipping, etc, shown in minute form.
In this beautiful painting, the hand of the imaginative artist manifests in the natural and glowing colours. The painting is evocative, as it makes the viewer imagine himself directly viewing this scenery at the real location. Dream paintings in which private fantasy is illustrated, display this kind of glorious gold-tinted and billowing clouds, and a rainbow reflected in the water.
The fore-ground has been clearly etched, and the far horizon recedes into the dim distance. The sense of perspective, with the depiction of the vastness of the landscape and the great length of the river, captures the elements of the open vistas. In this magical scene, the waterfall continuing its journey forward from the lower part of the cliff, as a river has been skilfully executed.
Different shades of green and earthy colour tones have been used to add to the natural look of the rocky plains. The waterfall and the river have been painted very realistically, showing turbulence as well as tranquility in the water. Marion Boddy-Evans About.com Painting says that painting less detail in the background, and giving the foreground preference, leads the viewer’s eye into the main focus of the landscape painting.

Lake by Moonlight" - Painting Acrylic, 2005

Width: 180 mm. Frame: Wood
Height: 250 mm. Theme:Landscape lake
Depth: 25 mm.
DESCRIPTION: A view across a lake to steep shores covered in pine forests. It is late evening and the sun is setting, whilst to the right the moon casts its reflection in the water. A boat with a single occupant rows across the lake.
In this painting, Austen Pinkerton has caught the atmosphere of dusk-time. The rich dark colours he has used, depict the moments after the setting sun disappears over the horizon, and nightfall is near.
The inky waters reflect the pearly light of the moon, and in that light, we can see a lone boatman rowing in the lake. The lonely figure intensifies the feeling of desolation and isolation that a viewer would experience if directly present in the scene. Marion Boddy-Evans About.com Painting writes about the intense emotion created in the viewer which is equal to the emotion felt by the artist who witnessed the scene. The glowing pine forests, reflecting the dying light of the sun, and the darkening sky have been realistically caught in the picture. Here the deepening night sky reflects its gloomy darkness in the water, which is calm and placid. Using a variety of blue and green tones, the late hour of the evening has been depicted, to show the deepening dusk-time.
The banded clouds and the distant moon shining through, the pale glow in the western sky, as an aftermath of the setting sun, picturise a beautiful skyscape. The rays of the sunset-glow highlight the pine trees with a silvery light.
The gradations of the treetops on the hill-slopes, and the colour gradations in the western sky attract the eye and are pleasing to behold. Colours provide their own sense of atmosphere and magic. The environment, the time and the place are caught in a dramatic fashion, in the imaginatively created painting.

CONCLUSION: According to the theme, techniques and approaches used, artists and their work provide a catalyst for further research and discovery. Austen Pinkerton had covered a diverse range of subject matters in his nearly four decades of art work. Three of his recent paintings have been discussed here, where he had practised traditional art methodology, even as a contemporary artist.




REFERENCES
Absolutearts Online Art Gallery. Web site:
http: www.absolutearts.com portfolio a austenpinkerton

Boddy-Evans, Marion. Painting, ‘About’ Web site: http: painting.about.com mbiopage.htm

Guardian, Online Arts Journal. Web site:
http: arts.guardian.co.uk turnerpeoplespoll story 0,,1073321,00.html

Kocur. Contemporary Art Since 1985 , Blackwell Publishing, 2004.




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